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The Army in the Roman Revolution

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Published by Routledge .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Number of Pages150
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7494185M
ISBN 100415394864
ISBN 109780415394864

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The Roman Revolution is a tricky book to review. Written back in , Ronald Syme’s book details Rome’s transition from republic to empire between 60 b.c. and 14 a.d. The book has been enormously influential and controversial since its release 73 years ago, and is probably the most famous book of Roman history this side of Edward Gibbon/5. The Roman Revolution is one of the most momentous periods of change in history, in which an imperial but quasidemocratic power changed into an autocracy. This book studies the way the Roman army changed in the last eighty years of the Republic, so that an army of imperial conquest became transformed into a set of rival personal armies under the.   The Roman Revolution is a profound and unconventional treatment of a great theme - the fall of the Republic and the decline of freedom in Rome between 60 BC and AD 14, and the rise to power of the greatest of the Roman Emperors, Augustus. The transformation of state and society, the violent transference of power and property, and the establishment of Augustus' rule are presented in Cited by: Addeddate Identifier Identifier-ark ark://t8mdp Ocr ABBYY FineReader Ppi Scanner Internet Archive Python library

The Roman Revolution () is a scholarly study of the final years of the ancient Roman Republic and the creation of the Roman Empire by Caesar book was the work of Sir Ronald Syme (–), a noted Tacitean scholar, and was published by the Oxford University was immediately controversial. Its main conclusion was that the structure of the Republic and its Senate. The army of the early Republic continued to evolve, and although there was a tendency among Romans to attribute such changes to great reformers, it is more likely that changes were the product of slow evolution rather than singular and deliberate policy of reform. The manipular formation was probably copied from Rome's Samnite enemies to the south, perhaps as a result of Roman defeats in the.   Paul Erdkamp is Research Fellow in Ancient History at Leiden University. He is author of Hunger and the Sword: Warfare and Food Supply in Roman Republican Wars (–30 BC) () and The Grain Market in the Roman Empire (), and editor of The Roman Army . The Roman Revolution is one of the most momentous periods of change in history. This text studies the way the Roman army changed in the last 80 years of the Republic, so that an army of imperial conquest became transformed into a set of rival personal armies under the control of the triumvirs.

  The Roman Revolution is a profound and unconventional treatment of a great theme - the fall of the Republic and the decline of freedom in Rome between 60 BC and AD 14, and the rise to power of the greatest of the Roman Emperors, Augustus. The transformation of state and society, the violent transference of power and property, and the establishment of Augustus' rule are presented in 4/5(5). The Roman Revolution is one of the most momentous periods of change in history, in which an imperial but quasidemocratic power changed into an autocracy. This book studies the way the Roman army changed in the last years of the Republic, so that an army of imperial conquest became a set of rival personal armies under the control of the triumvirs. Caesar's Great Success - Sustaining the Roman Army on Campaign pdf | MB | English | Author:Alexander Merrow; | BWNGFC2 | | Frontline Books Book Description: Logistics have become a principle, if not a governing factor, in modern military operations. Armies need to be fed and. THE ARMY AND THE LAND IN THE ROMAN REVOLUTION * By P. A. BRUNT The Roman revolution, which transformed an oligarchic Republic into the Principate of Augustus, had its origin, as Sallust (BJ, 4I-2) saw, partly in the misery of the poor, in.